Effects that Music has on your Body and Mind when Working out

Keeping fit is a universal thing now. No matter where you go on earth, there will be gyms, sports fields, hiking trails and other opportunities to exercise. If you are ready to exercise and lose weight, what you need now is good music. But this music should be customized to the kind of workouts you prefer to start with. In other words, the songs should be the kinds that make you want to get up and shake your body. The slower, relaxed workout music is fine, as it gets useful when you want to slow down and stop. Thus, your aim should be creating different playlists with varied songs that have different tempos.

Every work out session requires a warm up period. This is when you want to play music with an increasing beat range and speed.  It would help you carry out the warm up moves you like doing. If you are still not sure you want to play music during exercise, music has amazing effects on your performance. First, it has been found to have effects on your heart rate and respiration. Regarding the heart rate, it goes up and down in response to the music being played.  As for respiration, there are scholars who believe that it is greatly affected by music than the heart rate is.

According to Ellis and Brighhouse, 1952, Jazz music increases respiration rate better than any other music genre. Another thing that has been greatly researched concerns the effect of different music genres on your physical strength.  This is music with an ability to stimulate the body.  There is no adequate research to support the fact that stimulative music is capable of raising physical strength when working out. But the few research findings available concluded that songs that arouse the mind and body increase physical strength than seductive ones.

The effect of music on muscular endurance during exercise is an area that has been widely researched and reported. However, researchers’ findings consist of conflicting data. Some of the researchers found that participants who walked or jogged on a treadmill had a longer time to tiredness when listening to slow and soft music as compared to quick and loud music. In another study, young college men and women were able to increase their walking distance in an effortless manner when listening to some good music than with no music at all.

There is also a study that was done by Schwartz, Plowman and Fernhall in 1990. The three were investigating the effect of music on submaximal bicycle performance. Their study entailed a group of untrained college females and males. In conclusion, they found out that music had no substantial influence on their aerobic capacity, heart rate, respiration rate and other psychological variables. Further, they discovered that the psychological perception of difficulty remained unchanged even without music.

But the participants said they enjoyed bicycling while listening to music.  Many more effects of music on body and mind have been conducted. But the important thing is that people’s love for music can vary. There are some who are so fond of it that it doesn’t matter what they are doing. They can have a dose of music any day. There are others who have low to moderate love for music. The kind of love you have for music is not the point here.

It is the fact that you can use music to spice up your exercise so you can endure it more. So keep your feelings about music aside and just play it when warming up for intense or slow to moderate workouts.  Sooner than later you will grow to love exercising with proper workout music. It will keep you from unnecessary noises and distractions when you want your brain to be totally engrossed in exercise.

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